Home » Australia Politics Live: Final Question Time Of The Year Under Way; Trade Minister Cites ‘very Positive Vibe’ In China Meeting

Australia Politics Live: Final Question Time Of The Year Under Way; Trade Minister Cites ‘very Positive Vibe’ In China Meeting

Sally Sitou then asks Anthony Albanese a dixer:

“,”elementId”:”6a8dffc0-1965-49a5-9543-ea71c757981d”},{“_type”:”model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.BlockquoteBlockElement”,”html”:”

n

What is the latest information on the case of Prof Sean Turnell who recently returned to Australia after being wrongly imprisoned for two years in Myanmar? It is a great honour to have Prof Sean Turnell here today.

n

“,”elementId”:”9032c3b6-0ea1-42e5-a6cb-f4c18f9afe30″},{“_type”:”model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TextBlockElement”,”html”:”

Prof Turnell gives Sitou a thumbs up and squeezes his wife, Dr Ha Vu’s hand.

“,”elementId”:”f8f115b4-de44-43d7-824e-6a220b989827″},{“_type”:”model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TextBlockElement”,”html”:”

The chamber stands up in applause of the couple, who are sitting on the side of the chamber.

“,”elementId”:”449a68c6-5518-4d93-b90f-f2f2b225691b”},{“_type”:”model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TextBlockElement”,”html”:”

Albanese:

“,”elementId”:”d38cfd7e-b8da-4007-8e32-3b2c10d3ab8d”},{“_type”:”model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.BlockquoteBlockElement”,”html”:”

n

It is a great honour to have Prof Sean Turnell here in the chamber today with his magnificent wife. And I much enjoyed our discussion prior to question time when I welcome him into my office.

n

I had the pleasure of speaking with Sean when we both touched down in Bangkok a couple of weeks ago, indeed less than a couple of weeks ago, and as we entered the chamber here Sean said to me that two weeks ago he was in prison.

n

Incarcerated by a regime that has trashed human rights in Myanmar, and that incarcerated Prof Sean Turnell who was in Myanmar giving advice to the democratically elected leader of Myanmar and how their economy can be improved.

n

What he endured in his 650 days of incarceration is something no human being should have to endure and yet he has done it with grace and even with inhumane conditions with profound humanity, our relief and joy at your release is also tinged with no small amount of awe, awe and respect that your courage, optimism and resilience.

n

We are so glad as seen in the response across the chamber to have you back. I do want to also pay tribute to Dr Ha Vu, as the professor said on the 7.30 interview – a magnificent interview I would encourage everyone to watch with Sarah Ferguson the other night – this wasn’t in the marriage vows.

n

There must’ve been times when you felt like you are in a prison of a different nature but your determination and advocacy and the power of your love will prove greater than the hate and everything your beloved husband were up against. What happened to Prof Sean Turnell should never have happened but as said to me in our conversation he was so grateful for the support he received from Dfat and our consular staff and today I want to pay tribute to those who provided those glimmers of hope with their deliveries and advocacy. They gave him hope during dark times.

n

I want to acknowledge the efforts of foreign minister Penny Wong and her team and securing his release. In particular, on behalf of Australia, a grateful nation, I thank the exceptional assistance we received from our Asean partners and other friends including Japan and securing Prof Turnell’s release.

n

It was a very good day, Prof Turnell struck me with his humility upon his release. It was quite extraordinary. I am so pleased that he is now looking, it must be said a fair bit healthier. After an awful time. Most of all, I want to thank Prof Turnell for being here today and for displaying the absolute best of the Australian spirit. And I thank all those across the political spectrum and across our community who all campaigned so strongly and so consistently to secure the release. You are a most welcome guest as is your wife.

n

“,”elementId”:”4821dcd6-daa4-4aa2-9779-b6d80ceab9a3″}],”attributes”:{“pinned”:false,”keyEvent”:true,”summary”:false},”blockCreatedOn”:1669864105000,”blockCreatedOnDisplay”:”03.08 GMT”,”blockLastUpdated”:1669865988000,”blockLastUpdatedDisplay”:”03.39 GMT”,”blockFirstPublished”:1669864306000,”blockFirstPublishedDisplay”:”03.11 GMT”,”blockFirstPublishedDisplayNoTimezone”:”03.11″,”title”:”Prof Sean Turnell attends question time after release from Myanmar”,”contributors”:[],”primaryDateLine”:”Thu 1 Dec 2022 04.10 GMT”,”secondaryDateLine”:”First published on Wed 30 Nov 2022 19.41 GMT”},{“id”:”6388196e8f08f5eb2e314c46″,”elements”:[{“_type”:”model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TextBlockElement”,”html”:”

After the surprise appearance of Prof Sean Turnell, the house turns to question time and the matters the chamber has been arguing about all week.

“,”elementId”:”16cd4609-06bc-41bb-ba04-e176a303365e”},{“_type”:”model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TextBlockElement”,”html”:”

Except this time, there are a few Socceroo scarves in the chamber.

“,”elementId”:”d6bf3819-4626-40e1-b6e9-b6554485b709″}],”attributes”:{“pinned”:false,”keyEvent”:true,”summary”:false},”blockCreatedOn”:1669863790000,”blockCreatedOnDisplay”:”03.03 GMT”,”blockLastUpdated”:1669864185000,”blockLastUpdatedDisplay”:”03.09 GMT”,”blockFirstPublished”:1669863871000,”blockFirstPublishedDisplay”:”03.04 GMT”,”blockFirstPublishedDisplayNoTimezone”:”03.04″,”title”:”Question time begins”,”contributors”:[],”primaryDateLine”:”Thu 1 Dec 2022 04.10 GMT”,”secondaryDateLine”:”First published on Wed 30 Nov 2022 19.41 GMT”},{“id”:”638802d18f082ef70a24254f”,”elements”:[{“_type”:”model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TextBlockElement”,”html”:”

As Chris Bowen delivers the first of the climate change statements, which highlight the progress (or lack of) on meeting Australia’s climate targets, he has also released a statement on what the statement means.

“,”elementId”:”5802c3e2-1cf8-4d6c-813b-accbf313cb11″},{“_type”:”model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.BlockquoteBlockElement”,”html”:”

n

Climate change is a major threat to global economic prosperity, security and livelihoods and the window is closing on limiting global warming to 1.5C.

n

But the Statement also highlights that Australia has abundant renewable energy and mineral resources, and as the world decarbonises, there is great potential for growth in Australian industries and jobs.

n

The IEA’s world energy outlook (2022b) highlights that clean energy jobs already exceeding those in fossil fuels worldwide.

n

Yet for the last decade, climate has been used as a political football as the former government stumbled from one chaotic policy to the next. It was a decade of wasted opportunity.

n

And it left Australia unprepared for the current energy crisis, fuelled by high prices on global oil and gas markets.

n

Projections of emissions reductions by 2030 under the previous Government were at only 30%.

n

The 2022 emissions projection report, released today alongside the annual statement shows the actions and policies of this government so far place Australia on track for 40% emissions reduction by 2030.

n

That is, we’ve lifted the outlook by a third in just our first six months.

n

These projections do not yet include powering australia measures such as some elements of the powering the regions fund and the national electric vehicle strategy, nor additional commitments such as the national energy performance strategy.

n

Policies we received a mandate for, and are working on implementing including, will lift our result to at least 43%.

n

This is cause for optimism about the momentum shift that has occurred over just six months.

n

“,”elementId”:”9e17768f-3450-4269-b9ae-d1ffb848ab07″}],”attributes”:{“pinned”:false,”keyEvent”:true,”summary”:false},”blockCreatedOn”:1669858001000,”blockCreatedOnDisplay”:”01.26 GMT”,”blockLastUpdated”:1669858540000,”blockLastUpdatedDisplay”:”01.35 GMT”,”blockFirstPublished”:1669858060000,”blockFirstPublishedDisplay”:”01.27 GMT”,”blockFirstPublishedDisplayNoTimezone”:”01.27″,”title”:”Emissions projection shows Australia on track for 40% reduction by 2030, Bowen says”,”contributors”:[],”primaryDateLine”:”Thu 1 Dec 2022 04.10 GMT”,”secondaryDateLine”:”First published on Wed 30 Nov 2022 19.41 GMT”},{“id”:”6387ff8e8f08f5eb2e314ba3″,”elements”:[{“_type”:”model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TextBlockElement”,”html”:”

Chris Bowen:

“,”elementId”:”cc56bd62-8d92-487b-832a-881a7a6ed7db”},{“_type”:”model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.BlockquoteBlockElement”,”html”:”

n

The truth is that no Australian is spared from the impact of climate change – from the regions to the cities.

n

Not the farmer, working harder and harder amid more and more destructive disasters.

n

Not the tourism worker in Queensland, whose livelihood comes from sharing the joys of the world’s greatest coral reef.

n

Not the communities subjected to a seemingly never ending cavalcade of bushfires followed by flood, followed by flood again, all too dispiritingly soon.

n

Our beautiful land has always been subject to devastating natural disasters.

n

But those disasters are becoming: increasingly devastating, increasingly frequent, increasingly unnatural.

n

But as difficult as our current predicament is, it is still incumbent on us to be truthful and frank about how much worse it will be if we, and the world, don’t act now.

n

“,”elementId”:”fd5e6593-7fa0-485a-8f0e-9600cecca7e0″}],”attributes”:{“pinned”:false,”keyEvent”:true,”summary”:false},”blockCreatedOn”:1669857166000,”blockCreatedOnDisplay”:”01.12 GMT”,”blockLastUpdated”:1669857347000,”blockLastUpdatedDisplay”:”01.15 GMT”,”blockFirstPublished”:1669857233000,”blockFirstPublishedDisplay”:”01.13 GMT”,”blockFirstPublishedDisplayNoTimezone”:”01.13″,”title”:”Chris Bowen delivers annual climate change statement”,”contributors”:[],”primaryDateLine”:”Thu 1 Dec 2022 04.10 GMT”,”secondaryDateLine”:”First published on Wed 30 Nov 2022 19.41 GMT”},{“id”:”6387ee238f08f5eb2e314b1a”,”elements”:[{“_type”:”model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TextBlockElement”,”html”:”

National cabinet is not until next week, but the usual chess game is being played ahead of agreements being finalised, as the federal government tries to come up with a solution to the energy price crisis.

“,”elementId”:”33a79ff4-a8fe-46eb-b827-5e039f784f87″},{“_type”:”model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TextBlockElement”,”html”:”

Queensland and NSW are the sticking points when it comes to coal prices. There are reports those states are looking at their own coal price caps, which would mean someone (the commonwealth) stepping in to pay compensation to the producers (ain’t capitalism grand?!), which could blow up the whole deal before it is even agreed to.

“,”elementId”:”8fbb9e0c-fcf6-40f6-9ee8-fb8f28c48d0f”},{“_type”:”model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TextBlockElement”,”html”:”

On Sky News, Tanya Plibersek said she was confident of a solution:

“,”elementId”:”2259a1dc-84aa-4699-adb1-40f6dbc05f50″},{“_type”:”model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.BlockquoteBlockElement”,”html”:”

n

I don’t expect that at all. We’ve had very cooperative relations with the states on the energy crisis, and I know that my colleagues will be speaking to state leaders, the prime minister will be speaking to state leaders, and I have no doubt the energy minister is speaking to his counterparts as well.

n

Look, we’ve got a real problem in Australia with energy prices; we’ve had 10 years of inaction under the previous government, and of course the war in Ukraine has driven up energy costs around the world. We need to do something for families and businesses here in Australia, and I know that the state governments are equally determined to deal with the rising cost of living too. It’s having an impact on their economies too.

n

“,”elementId”:”c79ab8cf-0ab0-468a-b2cf-097c5c2d8bcf”}],”attributes”:{“pinned”:false,”keyEvent”:true,”summary”:false},”blockCreatedOn”:1669852707000,”blockCreatedOnDisplay”:”23.58 GMT”,”blockLastUpdated”:1669853331000,”blockLastUpdatedDisplay”:”00.08 GMT”,”blockFirstPublished”:1669852896000,”blockFirstPublishedDisplay”:”00.01 GMT”,”blockFirstPublishedDisplayNoTimezone”:”00.01″,”title”:”Tanya Plibersek says states ‘equally determined’ to relieve cost-of-living woes ahead of coal pricing talks”,”contributors”:[],”primaryDateLine”:”Thu 1 Dec 2022 04.10 GMT”,”secondaryDateLine”:”First published on Wed 30 Nov 2022 19.41 GMT”},{“id”:”6387d1b58f08ec68b60158dc”,”elements”:[{“_type”:”model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TextBlockElement”,”html”:”

Ahead of some of the final debate on the IR legislation, the Australia Institute has released new polling on how Australians feel about their wages.

“,”elementId”:”b347233a-1fb4-4bbf-8b6c-03386192ae4a”},{“_type”:”model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TextBlockElement”,”html”:”

Guardian columnist and labor market and fiscal policy director at the Australia Institute’s Centre for Future Work, Greg Jericho (you might know him as Grogs), reports “this research shows most Australians feel like they are falling behind and almost everyone believes it’s the Government job to do what it can to ensure wages keep up with the cost of living.

“,”elementId”:”4f6f08d9-8d33-4dca-b856-952e9c94bc85″},{“_type”:”model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.BlockquoteBlockElement”,”html”:”

n

This belief was consistent across all voting intentions, including 81% of Coalition voters.

n

“,”elementId”:”fcfdc5ab-3218-4c24-b9e6-27658de9cca1″},{“_type”:”model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TextBlockElement”,”html”:”

Unsurprisingly, given the pay differences, women are feeling the pinch more than men.

“,”elementId”:”1eff1070-6263-4e16-9953-c8da437052d0″},{“_type”:”model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TextBlockElement”,”html”:”

From the polling:

“,”elementId”:”5c02d779-5f79-4911-b2f7-f3dd36ffeedc”},{“_type”:”model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TextBlockElement”,”html”:”

    n

  • Nine in 10 Australians (87%) agree with the statement “it is the government’s responsibility to ensure that real wages grow to keep up with the cost of living”, irrespective of voting intention.

  • n

  • Agreement that it is the government’s responsibility to ensure that real wages grow to keep up with the cost of living is highest among Labor (92%) and Greens voters (92%).

  • n

  • Four in five Coalition (81%) and One Nation voters (84%) agree that it is the government’s responsibility to ensure that real wages grow to keep up with the cost of living.

  • n

  • For two in three Australians (68%), their wages have either not grown at all or grown slower than the cost of living.

  • n

  • This is higher among women, with 42% saying their wages have not grown at all and 34% saying their wages have grown slower than the cost of living.

  • n

  • Two in three Australians (67%) think changing laws to make it easier for workers to bargain collectively would be an effective way to get wages increasing faster.

  • n

  • Fewer than one in two Australians (46%) think that working harder personally at one’s job would be an effective way to get wages to increase faster.

  • n

“,”elementId”:”850144f2-9384-47a7-bfb9-9b8ee170801f”}],”attributes”:{“pinned”:false,”keyEvent”:true,”summary”:false},”blockCreatedOn”:1669845429000,”blockCreatedOnDisplay”:”21.57 GMT”,”blockLastUpdated”:1669852135000,”blockLastUpdatedDisplay”:”23.48 GMT”,”blockFirstPublished”:1669845665000,”blockFirstPublishedDisplay”:”22.01 GMT”,”blockFirstPublishedDisplayNoTimezone”:”22.01″,”title”:”Three-quarters of women say their wages have either not risen at all or not kept pace with cost of living”,”contributors”:[],”primaryDateLine”:”Thu 1 Dec 2022 04.10 GMT”,”secondaryDateLine”:”First published on Wed 30 Nov 2022 19.41 GMT”},{“id”:”6387ca4d8f08f5eb2e314a47″,”elements”:[{“_type”:”model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TextBlockElement”,”html”:”

The ACTU has released its latest cost of living survey showing up to a quarter of Australians are already skipping meals because of the cost of living.

“,”elementId”:”7682e1b0-6567-439a-83da-8d12b437115d”},{“_type”:”model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TextBlockElement”,”html”:”

Sally McManus told the ABC it is only going to get worse if something doesn’t happen to increase wages:

“,”elementId”:”31d4a862-d3a0-430f-bfce-c12802c661dd”},{“_type”:”model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.BlockquoteBlockElement”,”html”:”

n

When you start to run out of money because of inflation and the cost of things going up and your wage is not, you obviously got to lock at your budget and work out what you can cut out and for some people, there’s nothing left to cut out other than their meals.

n

We know that people are spending less on all the essentials and this is, you know, obviously really bad situation for families, but also bad for the economy when people don’t have that extra money to spend, they stop spending and, you know, in local businesses. We have got to address this issue and get wages moves again.

n

“,”elementId”:”b0c143a0-9112-45cb-8934-af88cdc81a00″}],”attributes”:{“pinned”:false,”keyEvent”:true,”summary”:false},”blockCreatedOn”:1669843533000,”blockCreatedOnDisplay”:”21.25 GMT”,”blockLastUpdated”:1669852122000,”blockLastUpdatedDisplay”:”23.48 GMT”,”blockFirstPublished”:1669843668000,”blockFirstPublishedDisplay”:”21.27 GMT”,”blockFirstPublishedDisplayNoTimezone”:”21.27″,”title”:”One in four Australians skipping meals due to cost-of-living pressure, survey shows”,”contributors”:[],”primaryDateLine”:”Thu 1 Dec 2022 04.10 GMT”,”secondaryDateLine”:”First published on Wed 30 Nov 2022 19.41 GMT”},{“id”:”6387bbbc8f082ef70a242352″,”elements”:[{“_type”:”model.dotcomrendering.pageElements.TextBlockElement”,”html”:”

Welcome to the last full sitting day of the year. We. have. almost. ma