Home » Dominic Raab Sets Out Details Of Bill Of Rights – UK Politics Live

Dominic Raab Sets Out Details Of Bill Of Rights – UK Politics Live

Labour claims bill of rights bill ‘an attack on women’ from a government that has ‘effectively decriminalised rape’

Ellie Reeves, a shadow justice minister, is responding for Labour. She says Steve Reed, the shadow justice secretary, cannot be present because of the recent death of his father.

The bill is a con, she says. It is unnecessary. So why is the government going ahead with this? Because this is a government that likes to blame others for its own failings.

She says it is shameful that some Tories even want to take Britain out of the ECHR. That is “shameful” from the party of Churchill, she says.

She challenges Raab to condemn his colleagues who want this.

Labour brought human rights back from Strasbourg, she says. The Human Rights Act is admired around the world. And it is effective, because British court decisions are now only rarely overturned in Strasbourg.

She says it is hypocritical of the government to defend human rights in Ukraine while snatching them away from people at home.

The Human Rights Act is held up around the world as an exemplar of modern human rights legislation, which is why the European Court very rarely overrules our judges, something that the review panel recognised in their report. It is a beacon of hope to people in countries whose basic human rights are trampled over by strong men and dictators.

And there is no better example right now than in Ukraine, where the rights of millions are being crushed under the jackboots of Vladimir Putin. What stunning hypocrisy from this government to preach to others about the importance of defending rights abroad while snatching British people’s rights away at home.

She gives examples of how the HRA has protected people’s rights. And she says the new bill is effectively an attack on women, because the HRA has protected women.

This bill of rights con isn’t just an attack on victims of crime who the state has failed to protect. It’s an attack on women. Women have used the Human Rights Act to challenge the police when they have either failed or refused to investigate rape and sexual assault cases.

It should come as no surprise that this bill has been put forward by a Conservative government that has effectively decriminalised rape. Last week’s scorecards showed pitiful progress on the record low rape convictions under this government.

The claim the government has effectively decriminalised rape provokes cries of protest from Tory MPs.

Reeves says there will be no point in women reporting rape allegations if they do not have a mechanism to enforce police to investigate.

Ellie Reeves Photograph: HoC

The retained EU law dashboard is now live. You can read it here.

And here is an explanation for what it does.

In his statement Jacob Rees-Mogg, the Brexit opportunities minister, also confirmed that the government will bring forward a Brexit freedoms bill that will make it easier for retained EU law to be repealed.

Rees-Mogg claims new online dashboard will help public nominate retained EU laws that could be scrapped

Jacob Rees-Mogg, the minister for Brexit opportunities, is making his Commons statement now.

He says Brexit was never an end in itself, but a means by which the UK could achieve great things.

He says the goverment wants the country to be the most sensibly regulated country in the world.

Lord Frost, his predecessor, launched a review into retained EU law, he says.

Rees-Mogg says not all Brexit freedoms can be grasped at once.

He says the public has great interest in what laws can be repealed. He says he is grateful to the readers of the Sun and Daily Express for the many suggestions they sent in.

The government is today launching a dashboard with details of more than 2,400 retained EU laws, covering more than 300 policy areas, he says.

He says the dashboard will keep a tally as retained laws are removed.

He says he is again inviting the public to share their ideas as to what EU retained laws should be retained, amended or repealed.

He describes his dashboard as “the supply side reformer’s El Dorado”.

And he also says it is good that the UK left the EU before it decided to mandate what sort of phone chargers firms should use. That is a typically short-sighted EU law that will reduce innovation, he claims.

(The EU decision to force all mobile phones to use a standard charger has been welcomed by consumers, although Rees-Mogg has probably been reading the Economist’s Charlemagne column saying it is a bad idea.)

Jonathan Gullis (Con) says that when he saw the deportation flight to Rwanda being halted he was so frustrated he said the UK should withdraw from the European convention of human rights. But he says he wants to say now that he was wrong. Having engaged with Dominic Raab, he now accepts that the principle set out in the bill of rights bill is a better way of dealing with the problem.

In fact, Gullis withdrew his call for the UK to leave the convention within about an hour of his making it on social media late at night on social media last time. Gullis reportedly had a rethink after recalling that the ECHR is an integral part of the Good Friday agreement, which the government supports. Gullis is parliamentary private secretary to the Northern Ireland secretary, Brandon Lewis, and presumably should have realised this in the first place.

Richard Graham (Con) asks why Raab wants to stop injunctions from the European court of human rights applying in the UK. Wouldn’t it be better to try winning these cases instead? And isn’t that against international laws?

Raab says the use of injunctions is a procedural matter. It is not part of the convention, he says. He says this is an example of how the court has tried to expand its role.

Starmer accuses Johnson of failing to do anything to prevent rail strikes

Here is the PA Media story about the Johnson/Starmer exchanges at PMQs.

Boris Johnson was accused of failing to lift a finger to prevent the rail strikes which have caused travel chaos.

Labour leader Keir Starmer said the prime minister and transport secretary Grant Shapps had refused to meet the unions representing rail workers ahead of this week’s industrial action.

But Johnson hit out at Starmer, saying it was a “disgrace” that Labour MPs had joined RMT members on the picket lines outside train stations.

“What we have got to do is modernise our railways,” Johnson told the Labour leader.

“It is a disgrace, when we are planning to make sure that you don’t have ticket offices that sell fewer than one ticket per hour, that he yesterday had 25 Labour MPs out on the picket lines.”

Johnson said Labour was “backing the strikers while we back the strivers”.

Starmer shot back: “The prime minister of this country and his transport secretary haven’t attended a single meeting, held a conversation or lifted a finger to stop these strikes.”

But he said on Monday they found time to attend a “lavish ball” to raise funds for the Tory party, where a donor has paid £120,000 to have a joint dinner with Johnson and predecessors Theresa May and David Cameron.

“If there is money coming his way, he is there,” Starmer said.

In the Commons Andrew Slaughter (Lab) says the legal commentator Joshua Rozenberg has described the bill as a “ragbag of restrictions” that will make people more vulnerable. Slaughter says it is a “damp squib”, and a legal nonsense.

Raab says the bill can’t be both a damp squib and a threat to people’s rights.

He says other commentators support what he is doing. He cites, as an example, the article written by Jonathan Sumption, the former supreme court judge in the Sunday Times at the weekend.

Raab claims his bill of rights bill partly inspired by principles set out in book on HRA written by Starmer in 1999

Raab is responding to Reeves.

He says the European convention on human rights is enshrined in the new bill.

Referring to Reeves’s comments about rapes, he says nothing in the bill weakens protections for victims. The bill will strengthen the position for vicitims, he claims.

And he says rape prosecutions are increasing.

He says Labour is blind to the problems with the Human Rights Act in a way that its architects are not. He says Jack Straw, home secretary when the HRA was passed, has said the HRA needs to be rebalanced. He has spoken of it being a villains’ charter, he says.

He says the model that he has followed is based on a textbook he read in 1999. It was written by an authority on the subject, and it said the role of the European court of human rights was “primarily concerned with supervision”. Its role was “subsidiary to that of domestic authorities”, Raab says. Raab says this book also said the European court had no role in domestic law unless human rights were being ignored.

Raab says someone is asking who wrote the book. It was Keir Starmer, he says. It was a seminal book on the HRA. He says Starmer was a more convincing lawyer than a politician.

UPDATE: Raab said:

I have to say, the comparison with what Russia or [Vladimir] Putin does, I’m afraid, shows a lack of moral compass on the side of those benches and not these. And then she diverted into a monologue on a very serious subject, which is in relation to rape.

Let us be absolutely crystal clear. There is absolutely nothing in this bill of rights that will do anything to weaken the protections of victims. Far from it, in relation to deportation of foreign national criminals, in relation to the release of dangerous rapists, in relation to what we do inside our prisons, this will strengthen our protection of victims and public protection.

Again, for the record, on such a serious issue on which I agree with her the importance, she might get her facts straight. The volume of rape convictions has increased by two thirds in the last year alone.

Labour claims bill of rights bill ‘an attack on women’ from a government that has ‘effectively decriminalised rape’

Ellie Reeves, a shadow justice minister, is responding for Labour. She says Steve Reed, the shadow justice secretary, cannot be present because of the recent death of his father.

The bill is a con, she says. It is unnecessary. So why is the government going ahead with this? Because this is a government that likes to blame others for its own failings.

She says it is shameful that some Tories even want to take Britain out of the ECHR. That is “shameful” from the party of Churchill, she says.

She challenges Raab to condemn his colleagues who want this.

Labour brought human rights back from Strasbourg, she says. The Human Rights Act is admired around the world. And it is effective, because British court decisions are now only rarely overturned in Strasbourg.

She says it is hypocritical of the government to defend human rights in Ukraine while snatching them away from people at home.

The Human Rights Act is held up around the world as an exemplar of modern human rights legislation, which is why the European Court very rarely overrules our judges, something that the review panel recognised in their report. It is a beacon of hope to people in countries whose basic human rights are trampled over by strong men and dictators.

And there is no better example right now than in Ukraine, where the rights of millions are being crushed under the jackboots of Vladimir Putin. What stunning hypocrisy from this government to preach to others about the importance of defending rights abroad while snatching British people’s rights away at home.

She gives examples of how the HRA has protected people’s rights. And she says the new bill is effectively an attack on women, because the HRA has protected women.

This bill of rights con isn’t just an attack on victims of crime who the state has failed to protect. It’s an attack on women. Women have used the Human Rights Act to challenge the police when they have either failed or refused to investigate rape and sexual assault cases.

It should come as no surprise that this bill has been put forward by a Conservative government that has effectively decriminalised rape. Last week’s scorecards showed pitiful progress on the record low rape convictions under this government.

The claim the government has effectively decriminalised rape provokes cries of protest from Tory MPs.

Reeves says there will be no point in women reporting rape allegations if they do not have a mechanism to enforce police to investigate.

Ellie Reeves Photograph: HoC

Raab says he is proud of the supreme court. The new bill will make it clear that the court does not have to follow case law from Strasbourg.

The European court of human rights has issued “expansive” rulings, he says.

The new bill will give the UK courts from freedom to interprete laws in their own way, using the “margin of appreciation” allowed under the convention.

The bill will allow frivolous human rights claims to be thrown out at an earlier stage, he says.

And it should make it easier for foreign criminals to be deported, which will “better protect the public”.

Ultimately it will make us freer, and our streets safer.

Dominic Raab, the justice secretary and deputy PM, is speaking now.

He says rights in Britain go back to Magna Carta. They do not just date from Labour’s Human Rights Act.

He says the UK will remain a party to the European convention on human rights.

He says his plans will strengthen freedom of speech. And it will recognise the right to jury trial – “something which is not prevalent on the continent but he’s very much part of the heritage and the pedigree of this country”.

Dominic Raab’s statement on bill of rights bill

Sir Lindsay Hoyle, the Commons speaker, begins with a reprimand to Dominic Raab for announcing details of the bill to the media first, and not to parliament.

He says, if Raab had not agreed to make a statement, he would have graned a UQ.

Johnson says everyone understands bullying is an appalling thing, and something that should not be tolerated. People should speak out against it, he says.

Carolyn Harris (Lab) asks the PM if he will implement a single annual payment for HRT.

Johnson says the health secretary is accelerating the work of the HRT taskforce to make sure women get the treatment they need.

From the BBC’s Chris Mason

V interesting nugget spotted by @ChristinaMcS — the Prime Minister suggesting there is no point importing coal when it available here, ‘especially metallurgical coal.’ Sounds like a heavy hint the govt might say yes to a new coal mine in Cumbria https://t.co/oa2dyt9UZe

— Chris Mason (@ChrisMasonBBC) June 22, 2022n”,”url”:”h